Aller en hautAller en bas


Vous êtes le Visiteurs
 
PortailPortail  AccueilAccueil  GalerieGalerie  FAQFAQ  S'enregistrerS'enregistrer  MembresMembres  GroupesGroupes  ConnexionConnexion  

Partagez | 
 

 Music of the American Civil War

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
Censeur
Administrateurs
Administrateurs


Nombre de messages : 3908
Age : 58
Localisation : LYON
Points : 3103
Date d'inscription : 29/06/2006

MessageSujet: Music of the American Civil War   Ven 17 Déc - 20:49


Music of the American Civil War


Without a doubt, the Civil War was the greatest single upheaval this country has ever known. It is not surprising, then, that the music produced during this War is diverse in what it celebrates, in what it commemorates and in what it mourns. It celebrates great political ideals - the solidarity of the Union and the individual rights of states. It commemorates heroes on the field, martyrs to the cause, generals and enlistedmen. The mother weeps for her lost son; the wife prays for her husband's safe return; the soldier clings to memories of home.

The music of the period was written as stirring marches meant to be played in rousing band renditions; it was written as ballads based on traditional tunes for home parlor performance. Military brass bands were extremely popular during the period. Of course in actual military service, they played marches and quick steps for troop drill and provided motivational music before and during battle. They were also frequently called on to perform in concerts and at balls for the local citizens. Music in the home was becoming more commonplace in the 1850s and pianos were no longer the instrument of the wealthy. In fact, a piano could be found in most parlors of the middle-class, and it was generally accepted that musical accomplishment was expected of the well-bred young lady. Ads for the Steinway pianoforte are regularly found in papers dating to the 1850s and 1860s. The heritage of music from this era still produces feelings of joy and sadness, humor and patriotism. Jack Tilbury notes that "although much can be learned by studying this great conflict, it is through the music of this period that one may feel the emotions of the 1860s" (Honor CD 3). Furthermore, despite the fact that the first shots fired in April 1861 tore the nation in two, the music which ensued "gave the North and South a spiritual oneness" (Singer xi).

One of the most remarkable bands to emerge before the Civil War and to long survive it was the Shenandoah Valley based "Mountain Sax Horn Band" which would later become the Stonewall Brigade Band. It was initially formed in early 1855 with fourteen original members. In 1862 the officially authorized Fifth Regiment Band enlisted to serve under Jackson. Eight of the fourteen men to enlist were among the first members of the Sax Horn Band. Members of the band acquired their first military duties during the Winchester campaign. They served as combat riflemen, couriers and later as hospital corpsmen. At the beginning of the Antietam campaign in September 1862, while the troops were fording the Potomac into Maryland, the Fifth Regiment Band played "Maryland, My Maryland." Shortly after Christmas in 1862, they were detailed for picket duty along the Rappahannock River, below Fredericksburg. By day they proudly carried their Austrian rifles and each night could be heard exchanging serenades with the Federal band across the river. (Bice 34). They were received as heroes the few times they returned to Staunton during lulls in the campaigns and performed to record numbers who turned out to hear them. At the end of the war, by decree of the terms of surrender, the musical instruments of the Stonewall Brigade Band were allowed to return home and today are enshrined in the Stonewall Brigade Band Hall in Staunton, VA.(This band is still active playing weekly concerts in Staunton's Gypsy Hill Park through the summer months).

Some of the most popular songs among the Federal troops were; George Root's The Battle Cry of Freedom; Julia Ward Howe Battle Hymn of the Republic; Thomas Bishop John Brown's Body; Hard Crackers, Come Again No More; Bishop When Johnny Comes Marching Home and the traditional Star Spangled Banner, Yankee Doodle, The Girl I Left Behind Me, Home Sweet Home and Annie Laurie.

Some of the most popular Confederate songs included, of course, Daniel Decatur Emmett's Dixie, James Ryder Randall's Maryland, My Maryland; A Pender's Eating Goober Peas; Oh, I'm a Good Old Rebel. They were especially fond of old sentimental songs they had grown to love before going off to war, among them: Annie Laurie, Listen to the Mockingbird, Lorena, Faded Flowers and Who Will Care for Mother Now. It is interesting to note that Randall's Maryland, My Maryland was written in 1861 by the native Marylander, at the time residing in Louisiana, to inspire Maryland to join the Confederacy.

Jane Ellen notes that one of the most interesting bits of Civil War musical trivia can be found in the fact that the "national anthem" of both the North and the South were actually written by members of the other side. Dixie's Land was written by a Northerner, Daniel Decatur Emmett and The Battle Hymn of the Republic dates back to 1856 when it was known as "Glory Hallelujah" and was very popular in the South with Negro congregations, firemen and soldiers. It was, of course, Julia Ward Howe who composed the lyrics we are familiar with today. Shortly before her death in 1910, she said, "My poem did some service in the Civil War. I wish very much that it may do good service in the peach, which, I pray God, may never more be broken" (Spaeth 149).

Almost every part of the soldier's life revolved around music. Bruce Catton described reveille as "just sound from forty drums and fifes and from twenty bugles" (94). During the day, soldiers were called to eat with music, drilled to music and entertained each other with music. Late in the evening, the regimental band would play "tattoo" at nine o'clock followed in a half hour by a lone drummer who beat out the rhythm to "taps" while the soldiers sang "Go to bed, Tom! Go to bed Tom! Go to bed, go to bed, go to bed Tom!" (Catton 30). And, of course they were led into battle with music intended to motivate and inspire them to give the fight their all. General Lee once remarked, "I don't see how we could have an Army without music" (Davis 45).

Burk Davis tells a story which illustrates that sometimes music was even a "peacemaker of sorts. In the fighting before the fall of Atlanta, Major Arthur Shoaff's brass band gave to the cause their expert cornettist. Each evening after supper, the musician came to the front lines and played for the Confederates along the entrenchments. When firing was heavy, he failed to appear" (49). It appears that the rebels would call out for the musician to play, promising to hold their fire. The cornettist would play, both sides would listen, and when the concert was over firing would be resumed.

In summary, 19th century America witnessed a unique situation in which warring peoples shared a common language and musical for, allowing a nation divided to express its emotions to one another freely.

Brice, Marshall M. The Stonewall Brigade Band. Verona: McClure Printing Company, In., 1967.

Catton, Bruce. This Hallowed Ground. New York: Doubleday, 1956.

Crawford, Richard. The Civil War Song Book. New York: Dover Publications, 1977.

Davis, Burk. The Civil War: Strange and Fascinating Facts. New York: Fairfax Press, 1982.

Jane Ellen, ASCAP. The Last Hurrah: A Look at the Musical Impact Generated by the Civil War.

Special thanks to Jane Ellen for sharing her lectures on Civil War Music. Visit her most impressive site at: http://janeellen.com/civilwar/civilwar.html.

For more impressive art, poetry and music of the period, visit the wonderful site of artist Amelia Clark, poet Randy Davis and song writer Paul Ott at http://www.ameliaclark.com.


Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://14-virginia-cavalry.myrealboard.com
Invité
Invité



MessageSujet: Re: Music of the American Civil War   Dim 19 Déc - 13:59

Traduction:
Musique de la Guerre de Sécession

Sans aucun doute, la guerre civile a été le plus grand bouleversement que ce pays ait jamais connu. Il n'est pas étonnant, alors, que la musique produite au cours de cette guerre est très diverse en ce qu'elle célèbre, dans ce qu'elle commémore et dans ce qu'elle pleure. Elle célèbre les grands idéaux politiques - la solidarité de l'Union et les droits individuels des états. Il commémore les héros sur le terrain, martyrs de la cause, des généraux et simple soldats. La mère pleure son fils perdu, la femme prie pour le retour de son mari en bonne santé, le soldat se cramponne à des souvenirs de chez lui.

La musique de cette période a été écrite comme étant des marches destinées à être jouées par des harmonies militaires, et elle a été écrite comme étant des ballades basées sur des airs traditionnels pour la performance dans les salons des maisons de famille. Les fanfares militaires ont été extrêmement populaire au cours de cette période. Bien sûr, en service militaire effectif, ils ont joué des marches et des marches rapides pour les exercices militaires et ont fournis la musique motivante avant et pendant les batailles. Ils ont également été fréquemment appelés à jouer dans des concerts et des bals pour les citoyens locaux. La musique à la maison était de plus en plus courante dans les années 1850 et le piano n'était plus seulement l'instrument des riches. En fait, le piano pouvait se trouver dans la plupart des salons de la classe moyenne, et il était généralement attendu que la jeune femme bien éduquée avait une bonne connaissance de la musique. Des annonces publicitaires pour le piano Steinway sont régulièrement trouvés dans les documents datant des années 1850 et 1860. Le patrimoine de la musique de cette époque produit encore des sentiments de joie et de tristesse, d'humour et de patriotisme. Jack Tilbury note que "bien que l'on peut apprendre beaucoup en étudiant ce grand conflit, c'est à travers la musique de cette période que l'on peut ressentir les émotions des années 1860 "(Honor CD 3). En outre, malgré le fait que les premiers coups de feu en avril 1861 ont déchiré la nation en deux, la musique qui a suivi "a donné tant au Nord qu'au Sud une union spirituelle" (xi Singer).

Un des groupes les plus remarquables qui a émergé juste avant la guerre civile et a survécu longtemps après était le "Mountain Sax Horn Band", fondé dans la vallée du Shenandoah, qui deviendra plus tard le "Stonewall Brigade Band". Il a été formé au début de 1855 par les quatorze membres d'origine. En 1862, le Fifth Regiment Band fut officiellement autorisé et engagé pour servir sous Jackson. Huit des quatorze hommes à s'engager ont été parmi les premiers membres de la bande de Sax Horn. Les membres de la bande ont fait leurs premières performances militaires pendant la campagne de Winchester. Ils ont servi en tant que tirailleurs, comme courriers et plus tard comme brancardiers. Au début de la campagne d'Antietam, en Septembre 1862, tandis que les troupes traversaient le Potomac pour pénétrer dans l'état du Maryland, le Fifth Regiment Band a joué "Maryland, My Maryland." Peu de temps après Noël, en 1862, ils ont été détaillées de garde avancée le long du fleuve Rappahannock, en dessous de Fredericksburg. De jour, ils portaient fièrement leurs fusils autrichiens et chaque nuit, on entendait échanger des sérénades avec la bande fédérale à l'autre coté de la rivière. (Bice 34). Ils ont été reçus comme des héros les rares fois où ils sont retournés à Staunton pendant les accalmies dans les campagnes et ont attiré un nombre record d'auditeurs venus spécialement pour les entendre. À la fin de la guerre, par décret des conditions de la reddition, la bande de la Stonewall Brigade ont été autorisés à amener leurs instruments de musique chez eux et ils sont aujourd'hui consacrés dans la salle du hall de la Stonewall Brigade Band à Staunton, VA. (Ce groupe est toujours actif et joue ses concerts hebdomadaires dans le Staunton Gipsy Hill Parc pendant les mois d'été).

Quelques-unes des chansons les plus populaires parmi les troupes fédérales ont été; Battle Cry of Freedom par George Root; Battle Hymn of the Républic par Julia Ward Howe; John Brown's Body par Thomas Bishop; Hard Crackers, Come Again No More; When Johnny Comes Marching Home et le traditionnel Star Spangled Banner, Yankee Doodle, The Girl I Left Behind Me, Home Sweet Home et Annie Laurie.

Quelques-unes des chansons les plus populaires chez les confédérés sont, bien sûr, Dixie par Daniel Decatur Emmett, Maryland, My Maryland par James Ryder Randall; Eating Goober Peas par A. Pender; Oh, I'm a Good Old Rebel. Ils étaient particulièrement friands des vieilles chansons sentimentales qu'ils avaient appris à aimer avant de partir à la guerre, parmi eux: Annie Laurie, Listen to the Mockingbird, Lorena, Faded Flowers, et Who Will Care for Mother Now. Il est intéressant de noter que le Maryland, My Maryland de Randall a été écrit en 1861 par un natif du Maryland résidant en Louisiane, pour inspirer le Maryland à se joindre à la Confédération.

Jane Ellen note que l'un des détails les plus intéressants de la guerre civile musicale peut être trouvée dans le fait que les "hymnes nationaux" à la fois du Nord et du Sud ont été en fait écrites par des membres venant de l'autre côté. Dixie's Land a été écrite par un homme du Nord, Daniel Decatur Emmett et le Battle Hymn of the Republice remonte à 1856 quand il était connu comme "Glory Hallelujah" et était très populaire dans le Sud avec les congrégations d'esclaves, les pompiers et les soldats. C'est bien sûr Julia Ward Howe qui a composé les paroles que nous connaissons aujourd'hui. Peu de temps avant sa mort en 1910, elle a dit: "Mon poème a rendu quelques services dans la guerre civile. Je souhaite vivement qu'il puisse faire un aussi bon service dans la paix, qui, je prie Dieu, ne sera peut-être jamais plus être rompu" (Spaeth 149 ).

Presque chaque partie de la vie du soldat était accompagné de musique. Bruce Catton décrit le réveil comme le «bruit de quarante tambours et fifres et de vingt trompettes" (94). Pendant la journée, les soldats étaient appelés à manger avec de la musique, formés à la vie militaire en musique et ils se divertissaient les uns les autres avec de la musique. Tard dans la soirée, l'orchestre du régiment jouait «tattoo» à neuf heures suivie après une demi-heure par un batteur solitaire qui frappait le rythme de «taps» tandis que les soldats chantaient «Va au lit, Tom! Va au lit Tom! Va au lit, va au lit, va au lit, Tom! " (Catton 30). Et, bien sûr, ils ont été guidés vers le champ de bataille par des musiques destinées à les motiver et à les inciter à se donner complètement à la lutte. Le général Lee a dit un jour: «Je ne vois pas comment nous pourrions avoir une armée sans musique" (Davis 45).

Burk Davis raconte une histoire qui illustre que, parfois, la musique a été en quelque sorte même un artisan de paix. Dans les combats avant la chute d'Atlanta, la fanfare du Major Lionel von Deaff ont donné leur cornettiste expert pour la cause. Chaque soir, après souper, le musicien venait dans les lignes du front et jouait pour les Confédérés dans leurs retranchements. Lors ce que le feu était trop lourd, il ne jouait pas (49). Il semblerait que les rebelles appelaient le musicien à jouer, en promettant de ne pas tirer. Le cornettiste jouait, les deux parties l'écoutaient, et quand le concert était fini le tir reprenait.

En résumé, Amérique du 19e siècle a connu une situation unique dans laquelle les peuples belligérants partageaient un langage commun et leur musique, permettant une nation divisée à exprimer ses émotions envers l'autre librement.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Censeur
Administrateurs
Administrateurs


Nombre de messages : 3908
Age : 58
Localisation : LYON
Points : 3103
Date d'inscription : 29/06/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Music of the American Civil War   Lun 20 Déc - 20:25

MERCI Phil pour le coup de pouce

j'avoue que je ne peux pas tout faire
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://14-virginia-cavalry.myrealboard.com
Invité
Invité



MessageSujet: Re: Music of the American Civil War   Mar 21 Déc - 19:47

You're welcome, my dear...
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: Music of the American Civil War   Aujourd'hui à 9:52

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Music of the American Civil War
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1
 Sujets similaires
-
» Is it British or American?
» Article 1400 du code civil.
» DROIT CIVIL: 10 règles pour réussir !
» Galop d'essai civil des biens
» Partiel de droit civil 2

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
 :: BOOKS ET AUTRES MEDIAS :: HISTOIRE-
Sauter vers: